As 103 countries have formally launched the Global Methane Pledge at COP26 and world leaders have formally promised to end world deforestation by 2030, animal agriculture needs to be formally recognised as one of the leading causes of methane emissions and deforestation if world leaders are serious about limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

More than 100 countries agreed to cut their methane emissions 30% by 2030 under the Global Methane Pledge, an initiative launched by the U.S. and European Union. And major foundations and philanthropic groups pledged over US$325 million to help countries and industry dramatically reduce methane emissions from multiple sources.

Methane is about 84 times more powerful at warming the climate than carbon dioxide over the short term. Since it only stays in the atmosphere for about 12 years, compared to hundreds of years for carbon dioxide, reducing the amount of methane human activities are adding to the atmosphere can have a quick impact on global warming.

A 30% cut in methane emissions could reduce projected warming by 0.2 degrees Celsius (0.36 F), according to European Union estimates. That buys some time while countries are lowering their harder-to-cut carbon dioxide emissions, but it doesn’t mean other efforts can slow down

Leading plant-based voices call for a significant and immediate reduction of animal sourced proteins and are urging world leaders to leverage the potential of plant-based proteins to mitigate the impact of food systems on the climate crisis.

On Tuesday we will:

  • Reveal Europe’s meat, dairy, fish, and egg reduction targets needed to hit climate targets;
  • Urging COP26 to formally acknowledge animal agriculture as a leading cause of methane emissions and deforestation;
  • Discuss the role of the private sector in moving towards more resilient food systems.

 

 


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